Asset Management Plan for Roads & Transport Services
Table of Contents

1. Introduction and Overview

Introduction - BRC's Asset Management Plans are based on the minimum requirements for Asset Management Plans in Queensland as detailed in the Asset Management Advancement Program.

1.1 Scope

1.2 Asset Hierarchies

1.2.1 Road Hierarchy

BRC's Road Hierarchy consists of the following road classes.

  • Access Place (AP) - An Access Place is a no though road or cul-de-sac that provides direct access to adjoining residential properties.
  • Access Street (AS) - An access street is a through street that provides direct access to adjoining residential properties.
  • Arterial Route (A) - An arterial route is a road or a street that provides inter-regional connections between major activity and service centres and major urban areas with the city.
  • CBD/Commercial Access Street (CA) - A CBD/Commercial Access Street is a street that provides access to properties and businesses within the commercial centres of the city and surrounding towns.
  • Collector (Neighbourhood) (C) - A Neighbourhood Collector is a road or street that provides a connection between residential access streets and primary traffic carrying roads.
  • Highway (H) - A highway is road that provides a connection between large regional urban centres and primarily caters for long distance traffic movements.
  • Industrial Access Street (IA) - An industrial access street is a street that provides direct access to individual (industrial) properties.
  • Industrial Collector Street (IC) - An industrial collector street is a street that provides connection between industrial access streets and connects directly to suburban trunk collectors and sub arterial routes.
  • Internal Road (IR) - An internal road is a road located within a BRC owned facility, such as a Water Treatment Plant or Sports Facility.
  • Principal Rural Road (PR) - A principal rural road is a road that provides a connection between rural villages/townships, other higher order regional roads and urban centres.
  • Rural Access Road (RA) - A Rural Access Road is a road that provides direct access to adjoining rural and/or rural residential properties.
  • Rural Collector Road (RC) A rural collector road is a road that provides a connection between rural access roads and other high order roads and provides direct access to adjoining rural and/or rural residential properties.
  • Sub Arterial Route (SA) - A sub arterial route is a road or street that connects arterial routes through & around major urban areas within the city.
  • Trunk Collector (TC) - A trunk collector is a road or street that carries primarily inter suburb traffic.
  • Village/Township Access Street (VA) - A Village/Township Access Street is a street that provides access to properties in rural townships and villages.

1.2.2 Bridge Hierarchy

1.2.3 Footpath Hierarchy

A footpath hierarchy has yet to be developed, but Council is currently working on a "Multi Modal Pathways Strategy", and this strategy could become the basis for a future footpath hierarchy.

1.3 Quantitative Data

1.3.1 Road Lengths

On 1 September 2011 BRC's Asset Register reported the following road lengths:

Surface Type Length
Asphalt 253.6 km
Concrete 2.4 km
Pavers 0.6 km
Sprayed Seal 1,613.6 km
None 1,123.0 km
Total 3,008.2 km
Road Type Length
Sealed 1,884.1 km
Unsealed 1,124.1 km
Total 3,008.2 km
Road Type Length
Formed 495.7 km
Gravel 621.5 km
Rural Sealed 1,288.9 km
Unformed 6.9 km
Urban Sealed 595.2 km
Total 3,008.2 km

Notes:

  1. It is probable that the length of unformed roads is significantly under reported.
  2. The difference in the total length of sealed roads reported in the above tables is due to data anomalies which are currently being investigated.
  3. This equates to approximately 11.27 million sq.m of seal.

1.3.2 Footpaths Lengths

As at August 2010 the Asset Register contained the following footpath lengths:

Surface Type Length
Asphalt 3.2 km
Bitumen 1.1 km
Brick Pavers 11.9 km
Concrete 77.3 km
Concrete Paving 0.5 km
Cracker Dust 6.7 km
Gravel 3.5 km
Total 104.1 km

1.4 Links to Other Documents

The following documents have been referred to in developing this plan.

General Documents

NOTE: The BRC Asset Management Policy is a Draft version and will be set up to be adopted by Management /Council and incorporated into the LTAMP

Road Specific Documents

1.5 Legislative and Regulatory Requirements

Legislative and Regulatory Requirements - The principal relevant statutes regulating the asset management practices of Councils are:

The Department of Infrastructure and Planning requirements for asset management plans include:

  • description of the maintenance program
  • timing of program
  • maintenance expense per asset class and sub-class

2. Service Levels

A Customer Satisfaction Survey is conducted annually to gauge community expectations. The results of these surveys are taken into account when setting service levels.

2.1 Strategic/Community Service Levels

The table below lists Strategic/Community Service Levels for Roads

Service Level Performance Measure
The road network and all activities associated with management, maintenance and operation of the network comply with all relevant Acts and Regulations. Full compliance with relevant Acts & Regulations
To provide and maintain a safe transport network. Crash statistics trending in right direction
To provide a service that reflects the priorities of its users User input to regular customer satisfaction surveys aligns with Council priorities.
Respond to customer requests within one week Percentage of customer requests answered on time.

2.2 Maintenance Service Levels

The table below lists Maintenance Service Levels for Roads.

Problem/Defect Intervention Level Remedy/Activity Response Time
Hazard Report N/A Condition Inspection/Temporary Signage Urgent - 24 hours, Non-Urgent - 1 week
Blocked Culvert Noticeable reduction in capacity Culvert Cleaning 3 months
Blocked Drain Noticeable reduction in capacity Drain Cleaning 3 months
Edge Break Seal width reduced by 500mm Bitumen Repairs 2 years
Edge Drop Off >100mm Shoulder Maintenance 1 months
Excessive Roadside Vegetation Operator judgment call Roadside Slashing/Herbicide Spraying When possible
Faded Roadmarkings more than 50% faded Line Marking 2 months
Shoulder Gravel Wash-away more than 1 cubic metre of shoulder lost Spot Gravel Repair 3 months
Missing or Damaged Sign Missing or unreadable Sign Replacement/Repair 1 week
Pothole >75mm depth and/or 200mm diameter Bitumen Repairs 1 month
Protruding Footpath Lip >5mm in otherwise smooth footpath Footpath Repair 3 months
Rough Gravel Surface Unable to travel comfortably at 80km/hr Patrol Grading 3 months
Rubbish on Road >10% reduction in traction Street Sweeping 1 month
Water ponding against kerb >5m of kerb affected Kerb & Channel Repair 12 months

NOTE: There will be cyclic reviews of these Service Levels by Roads Staff and updated as required in the Asset Management Plan.

3. Future Demand

3.1 Future requirements associated with corporate plans or operational plans

Future Requirements Roads - No future requirements associated with the corporate plan or the operational plan have been identified.

3.2 Known or possible areas for expansion

Expansion - There are several factors that may affect the demand for and on Council assets.

3.2.1 New Subdivisions

New Subdivisions - Council is gifted infrastructure on a regular basis, with a significant number of new subdivisions coming off maintenance each year.

3.2.2 Population Growth

Population Growth - According to the OESR Queensland Regional Database & Google Public Data Explorer Bundaberg Regional Council's estimated population has increased from 78,943 in 2001 to 95,132 in 2009.

Year Population % Increase
2001 78,943 -
2002 80,369 1.81%
2003 81,579 1.51%
2004 83,238 2.03%
2005 85,522 2.74%
2006 87,898 2.78%
2007 90,302 2.73%
2008 92,651 2.60%
2009 95,132 3.00%

3.2.3 Changes in Land Use

Changes in Land Use - Bundaberg Regional Council has yet to finalise a consolidated Planning Scheme for the amalgamated Council. If any changes in land use affecting future demand are included in the new scheme they will be identified here.

3.2.4 Changes to Government Policy & Regulations

No changes to government policy or regulations have been identified in this plan.

3.3 Asset classes and potential acquisition dates

New Asset Classes - It is not anticipated that any new asset classes will be acquired within the time frame of this plan.

3.4 Cost estimates

Cost to Roads of Future Demand - The costs of changes in the future demand on road assets have yet to be calculated.

3.5 Impact of future demand on service levels, asset lifecycle and financial considerations

The impact of future demand on service levels, asset life-cycle and financial considerations has yet to be ascertained.

3.6 Technological Change Forecast

Technological Change Forecast - The past few centuries have seen enormous technological advances, and in computing, nanotechnology & biological science the current rate of advancement is exponential. (e.g. Moore's Law.) If this trend continues the impact on Local Government is potentially enormous, and obsolescence could become the main factor in determining the useful lives of many asset classes.

There are a number of key areas in which this rapid technological advancement could affect the way assets are constructed and maintained.

3.6.1 Energy

Energy - The availability or lack of availability of relatively cheap energy will have a huge impact on the cost of and need for infrastructure assets into the future.

Oil reserves are a finite resource, and transport systems will almost certainly become more and more dependent on synthetic fuels, bio-fuels and/or electrical power in the medium to long term.

If the cost of transport increases the cost of constructing infrastructure assets is likely to increase commensurately.

On the other hand, there are a couple of possible reasons that energy might actually become cheaper in the medium term which would drive construction costs down.

The amount of solar power being generated is increasing exponentially, and there are number of reasons to suspect the efficiency of solar power generation will improve markedly in the short to medium term.

Commercial fusion power is not expected to be available until at least 2040, but its impact if and when it does become a reality could be enormous, given that there is enough heavy hydrogen in the oceans to satisfy mankind's energy needs for millions of years.

3.6.2 New Materials & Construction Techniques

New Materials & Construction Techniques - It is possible that Automated Construction Techniques like D-Shape & Contour Crafting will have a significant impact on the construction of civil assets in the not-to-distant future. Given the long lives of some civil assets it is feasible that by the time they are due to be replaced automated construction techniques will enable them to be replaced for considerably less than their current replacement cost.

High tech materials like carbon nanotubes could result in decreased construction costs.

New Road Materials & Construction Techniques - The concept of artificial sandstone roads is being investigated. If the technology is developed into a practical, cost effective alternative, it would certainly impact on future road construction.

3.6.3 Increased Collaboration & Knowledge Sharing

Collaboration & Knowledge Sharing - Increased collaboration & knowledge sharing via the internet has the potential to reduce overhead costs significantly by reducing the amount of duplication of effort between Councils.

3.6.4 Artificial Intelligence & Expert Systems

Artificial Intelligence & Expert Systems - Some observers believe that human level general artificial intelligence could be a reality as soon as 2030.

3.6.5 Future of Transport

Future of Transport - Changes in transport will effect the type of road infrastructure required and how road data is collected.

  • Robotic Self Driving Cars already exist. As they become more common, it should be possible to have them automatically collect road condition & traffic volume data. This would provide councils with excellent up-to-the-minute information with which to plan road related capital works & maintenance. Robotic cars should also in theory be safer, and less prone to accidents.

4. Lifecycle Management and Financial Considerations

4.1 Useful Life

The useful life of road assets will depend on a range of environmental factors. The estimated useful lives given below which have been extracted from the Assetic Asset Management System are best guess averages.

Asset Sub-classpixel.png Useful Life Average RUL Residual Value
Formation 150 years 138 years 90%
Pavement 80 years 60 years 20%
Asphalt Overlay 25 years 16 years 0%
Sprayed Seal 15 years 10 years 0%
Kerb & Channel 70 years 55 years 0%
Gravel Resheets 12 years 8 years 20%
Concrete Footpaths 60 years 45.9 years 30%
Asphalt Footpath 20 years 13.7 years 0%
Brick Paver Footpath 30 years 20.4 years TBA

4.2 Condition

4.2.1 Road Condition

BRC collects several sets of road condition data, including;

4.2.1.1 Automated Road Surveys

BRC has employed Contractors to carry out Automated Road Surveys from time to time.

The most recent survey was carried out by ARRB in January and February in 2010.

As part of the project a Pavement Condition Index (PCI) and Surface Condition Index (SCI) is to be generated for each road segment inspected. The ARRB PCI Index appears to be an open ended scale with 0 designating an asset in perfect condition. The 2010 road survey conducted by ARRB identified road segments with PCIs in the range 2 to 275.

The Condition Distribution Graphs below are based on the results of the ARRB survery.

2010-PCI-Distribution-Graph-Grouped.png
.
SCI-Distribution-Graph-2010.png
2010-Roughness-Graph.png 2010-Rutting-Distribution-Graph.png 2010-Crocodile-Cracking-Extent.png
Roughness.png Rutting.png cce.png

4.2.1.2 Visual Inspection of Sealed Roads

A Technical Officer in the Roads & Drainage Section does an annual Visual Inspection of Sealed Roads to fine tune the annual resealing program. Roads are given a score between 1 and 5 on the following basis.

Score Criteria
1 The surface is in near perfect condition. This road does not require a reseal at this point in time. Don’t Reseal.
2 The surface is starting to show signs of wear, e.g. minor pavement distortion, isolated cracking and/or isolated pot holes. Ideal time to Reseal.
3 Seal is not performing, ongoing pothole repairs, slight pavement distortion. Essential to patch out potholes and any edge defects. However pavement will suffice with just a reseal. Ideal time to Reseal.
4 Pavement is failing, failures in isolated areas, distorting to wheel ruts & shoving, seal is not performing and shows signs of continuous repairs. Resurfacing is essential however pavement repairs are required before any resurfacing work can be carried out. Major pavement repair work has to be carried out before Reseal can occur.
5 Pavement is not performing. Large areas have to be repaired. A good time to consider a full reconstruction of the failed sections or the entire road. Do Not Seal.

4.2.2 Footpath Condition

Footpath condition is measured on a 0 to 6 Scale

Score Description Example
0 Brand new footpath in perfect condition BRC-Footpath-Condition-0.jpg
1 Very good condition - no visible defects BRC-Footpath-Condition-1.jpg
2 Good condition - only very minor defects visible BRC-Footpath-Condition-2.jpg
3 Average condition - a number of defects are visible, but is still quite serviceable BRC-Footpath-Condition-3.jpg
4 Below average condition - quite a few obvious defects are visible BRC-Footpath-Condition-4.jpg
5 Poor Condition - significant percentage of footpath exhibiting severe cracking and other defects BRC-Footpath-Condition-5.jpg
6 Very very poor condition - totally unsuitable for pedestrian use BRC-Footpath-Condition-6.jpg

BRC's footpath network, is in pretty good condition, and most defective panels are replaced under maintenance before the segment as a whole deteriorates enough to trigger a renewal.

4.3 Valuations

4.3.1 Road Unit Rates

Road Unit Rates - The 2008 unit rates below were developed by ACEAM for the post-amalgamation revaluation. An explanation of how the July 2010 rates were devised can be found here and the 2012 rates were developed by the APV revaluation.

Component March 2008 Rate July 2010 Rate July 2012 Rate Units
Asphalt Road Surface $14.18 $14.89 $25.62 sq.m
Sprayed Seal Urban Streets $5.81 $6.10 $10.19 sq.m
Sprayed Seal Rural Roads $8.48 sq.m
Slurry Seal $14.68 sq.m
Concrete Pavement $84.66 $88.89 $115.71 sq.m
Road Pavers $107.98 $113.38 $110.03 sq.m
Sealed Road Pavement Urban Streets $52.15 $54.76 $50.55 sq.m
Sealed Road Pavement Rural Roads $37.20 sq.m
Gravel Pavement $13.79 $14.48 $15.61 sq.m
Unsealed Road Formation $5.87 $6.16 $6.54 sq.m
Sealed Road Formation $8.93 $9.38 $8.68 sq.m
Unformed Formation $1.14 sq.m
Runway Formation $8.68 sq.m
Runway Pavement $127.12 sq.m
Runway Surface $83.25 sq.m
Asphalt Footpath $55.98 $58.78 $56.33 sq.m
Concrete Footpath $74.58 $78.38 $103.29 sq.m
Paved Footpath $101.36 $106.43 $104.51 sq.m
Kerb & Channel $62.66 $65.79 $72.06 m
Barrier Kerb $62.66 $65.79 $72.06 m
Barrier Kerb & Channel $62.66 $65.79 $72.06 m
Channel $62.66 $65.79 $72.06 m
Edge Restraint $62.66 $65.79 $72.06 m
Inverted Channel $62.66 $65.79 $72.06 m
Mountable Kerb $62.66 $65.79 $72.06 m
Mountable Kerb & Channel $62.66 $65.79 $72.06 m
Semi Mountable $62.66 $65.79 $72.06 m
Concrete Road Bridge $5,154.26 $5,411.98 $4,637.81 sq.m
Concrete Road Bridge Super Structure $3,246.47 sq.m
Precast concrete Road Bridge Super Structure $2,318.90 sq.m
Reinforced Concrete Road Bridge Super Structure $3,246.47 sq.m
Concrete Road Bridge Sub Structure $1,159.45 sq.m
Reinforced Concrete Road Bridge Sub Structure $1,159.45 sq.m
Concrete Road Bridge Surface $115.95 sq.m
Reinforced Concrete Road Bridge Surface $115.95 sq.m
Steel Road Bridge $6,789.59 $7,129.07 $4,114.51 sq.m
Steel Road Bridge Super Structure $2,880.15 sq.m
Steel Road Bridge Sub Structure $1,028.63 sq.m
Steel Road Bridge Surface $102.86 sq.m
Timber Road Bridge $4,091.12 sq.m
Timber Road Bridge Super Structure $2,863.78 sq.m
Timber Medium Road Bridge Super Structure $3,293.35 sq.m
Timber Road Bridge Sub Structure $1,022.78 sq.m
Timber Medium Road Bridge Surface $102.28 sq.m
Bridge Rail Concrete $115.95 sq.m (bridge area)
Bridge Rail Reinforced Concrete $115.95 sq.m (bridge area)
Bridge Rail Timber $102.28 sq.m (bridge area)
Bridge Rail Steel $102.86 sq.m (bridge area)
Concrete Footbridge $1,814.48 $1,905.20 $1,744.61 sq.m
Concrete Footbridge Super Structure $1,264.84 sq.m
Concrete Footbridge Sub Structure $436.15 sq.m
Reinforced Concrete Footbridge Super Structure $1,264.84 sq.m
Reinforced Concrete Footbridge Sub Structure $436.15 sq.m
Concrete Footbridge Surface sq.m
Timber Footbridge $912.33 $957.95 $1,187.70 sq.m
Timber Footbridge Super Structure $861.08 sq.m
Timber Footbridge Sub Structure $296.63 sq.m
Timber Footbridge Surface sq.m
Footbridge Rail Concrete $43.62 sq.m (footbridge area)
Footbridge Rail Reinforced Concrete $43.62 sq.m (footbridge area)
Footbridge Rail Timber $29.69 sq.m (footbridge area)

4.3.2 Footpath Unit Rates

Footpath Unit Rates - The 2008 unit rates below were developed by ACEAM for the post-amalgamation revaluation and the 2012 rates were developed by the APV revaluation.

Component March 2008 Rate July 2012 Rate ~ Units
Asphalt $56.00 $56.33 sq.m
Sprayed Seal/ Bitumen Varies $47.20 sq.m
Concrete $74.60 $103.29 sq.m
Concrete Paving NA $104.51 sq.m
Brick Pavers $101.40 $104.51 sq.m
Gravel Varies $19.88 sq.m
Cracker Dust NA $15.28 sq.m
Pavers NA $104.51 sq.m

4.3.3 Road Valuation

The Road Valuation figures below were extracted from the June 2010 Financial Reconciliation Report.

Asset Sub-classpixel.png Replacement Cost Written Down Replacement Cost Annual Depreciation
Footpaths $13,608,186.66 $11,229,275.76 $2,378,910.89
Kerbs & Channel $32,911,890.4 $24,962,160.17 $7,949,730.23
Roads - Formation $178,734,194 $177,198,132.97 $1,536,061.03
Roads - Pavement $484,231,782.39 $392,029,684.45 $92,202,097.94
Roads - Surface $115,519,184.41 $71,969,385.32 $43,549,799.09
Traffic Management Devices $5,502,128.40 $3,969,317.95 $1,532,810.45
Total $830,507,366.26 $681,357,956.62 $149,149,409.63

4.3.4 Bridge Valuation

The Bridge Valuation figures below were extracted from the June 2010 Financial Reconciliation Report.

Asset Sub-classpixel.png Replacement Cost Written Down Replacement Cost Annual Depreciation
Bridge Rails $1,587,066.54 $945,995.89 $641,070.65
Bridge Sub Structures $11,589,026.94 $7,379,011.66 $4,210,015.28
Bridge Super Structures $32,048,102.57 $20,252,615.35 $11,795,487.22
Bridge Surfaces $684,939.06 $390,157.54 $294,781.52
Total $45,909,135.11 $28,967,780.44 $16,941,354.67

4.4 Maintenance

4.4.1 Maintenance Activities & Expenditure

Maintenance Activities & Expenditure - The table below shows the amount that Council budgets for a range of road related maintenance activities.
Information about the various maintenance activities can be accessed by clicking the links in the table.
Future developments in the Asset Management systems should allow Council to extract annual maintenance program forecasts based on service levels, road condition and renewal programs.

Maintenance Activity 2010/2011 Projected Expenditure
Rural Vegetation Management $100,000
Footpath Maintenance $140,000
Streetscape Maintenance $720,000
Roadside Slashing $360,000
Roads Environment $2,360,000
Herbicide Spraying $320,000
Kerb & Channel Repairs $200,000
Road Shoulder Maintenance $800,000
Street Sweeping $450,000
Bitumen Repairs $900,000
Pavement Repairs $650,000
General Unsealed Road Maintenance $1,600,000
Spot Gravel Repairs $900,000
Culvert & Pipe Repairs & Maintenance $50,000
Timber Bridge Maintenance $70,000
Concrete Bridge Maintenance $10,000
Bridge Inspections $120,000
Traffic Control Device Maintenance $30,000
Signs & Guide Post Repairs & Replacements $320,000
Line Marking $150,000
Bus Shelter Repairs $20,000
Vandalism Repairs $30,000
Emergency Call Outs $50,000
Miscellaneous Road Maintenance $150,000
Supervision and Inspection $300,000
Off Road Pathway Inspections $10,000
Off Road Pathway Repairs $10,000

4.4.2 Main Roads Maintenance Activities

Main Roads Maintenance Activities - The way maintenance activities done for Main Roads are currently described differently to BRC maintenance activities. Council aims to standardise the terminology and costing structures in 2012.

  • Edge Repair (Manual)
  • Pothole Patching
  • Surface Correction with Premix/Asphalt
  • Surface Sweeping
  • Surface Debris Removal
  • Other Bituminous Surface Work
  • Pavement Repairs - Depth up to 200mm
  • Pavement Repairs - Depth up to 300mm
  • Pavement Repairs - Depth up to 400mm
  • Pavement Repairs - Depth up to 500mm
  • Asphalt Pave Repairs - Depth up to 200mm
  • Asphalt Pave Repairs - Depth up to 300mm
  • Asphalt Pave Repairs - Depth up to 400mm
  • Asphalt Pave Repairs - Depth up to 500mm
  • Insitu Stabilisation - Minor (<500m2)
  • Light Shoulder Grading
  • Heavy Shoulder Grading - Rural
  • Gravel Supply - Heavy Shoulder Grading
  • Shoulder Resheeting
  • Other Unsealed Shoulder Work
  • Clean Earth and Concrete Surface Drains
  • Other Surface Drain Work
  • Other Culvert - Pipe and Pit Work
  • Tractor Slashing Rural
  • Tractor Slashing
  • Tractor Slashing - Boom Mower
  • Clearing
  • Herbicide Spot Spraying - Declared Plant
  • Herbicide Spraying
  • Other Vegetation Control Works
  • Roadside Litter Collection - Rural
  • Other Roadside Work
  • Other Restoration Work
  • Service Rest Area
  • Emergency Callout Acitivity
  • Repair Signs (exculding Guide Signs)
  • Other Sign Work
  • Repair or Replace Guide Markers
  • Other Road Guide Post and Marker Work
  • Other Furniture Repairs
  • Inspections For Forward List of Works
  • Supervision & Administration

4.5 Road Renewal & Replacement

Road Renewal & Replacement - Council's Road Renewal Program will eventually be based on the estimated RULs of individual assets in Council's Asset Register, at this point in time however its development is more of an art than a science.

Renewal expenditure reinstates existing service potential, generally does not generate addition revenue, but may reduce future operating and maintenance expenditure if completed at the optimum time, e.g. resurfacing or resheeting a material part of a road network.

In 2012 Council will generate 1st Cut Renewal Programs from the Asset management system to inform the budget process for 2012/13. Council will base these estimates on the assets Remaining Useful Life’s (RULs) and replacement costs as recorded in the Council's Asset Register.

Council’s strategy is to develop a prioritised Capital Expenditure Program including (Renewals; Upgrades; and New) based on service levels, condition assessments, intervention levels, remaining useful life, and current service and maintenance levels.

4.5.1 Renewal Expenditure

Road Renewal Expenditure - The table below shows the overall amounts set aside for capital works on roads & related assets in Council's Ten Year Capital Expenditure Forecast.

Planned Capital Expenditure on Roads
Major Projects Minor Projects Resurfacing Works Foot & Bicycle Paths Total
2010-2011 $6,900,000 $2,100,000 $4,200,000 $2,900,000 $16,100,000
2011-2012 $7,814,000 $2,226,000 $5,452,000 $530,000 $16,022,000
2012-2013 $8,282,840 $2,359,560 $5,779,120 $561,800 $16,983,320
2013-2014 $8,779,810 $2,501,134 $6,125,867 $595,508 $18,002,319
2014-2015 $9,306,599 $2,651,202 $6,493,419 $631,238 $19,082,458
2015-2016 $9,864,995 $2,810,274 $6,883,024 $669,113 $20,227,406
2016-2017 $10,456,895 $2,978,890 $7,296,006 $709,260 $21,441,051
2017-2018 $11,084,308 $3,157,624 $7,733,766 $751,815 $22,727,513
2018-2019 $11,749,367 $3,347,081 $8,197,792 $796,924 24,091,164
2019-2020
2020-2021

Note: Flooding in late 2010 & early 2011 resulted in expenditure in 2010-2012 to be increased dramatically, i.e. $31 million in 2010/11 & $64 million in 2011/12.

The exact break up of capital expenditure in future years is uncertain, but an estimate has been made by applying typical new to renewal ratios to the above figures.

Planned Renewal Expenditure on Roads
Major Projects Minor Projects Resurfacing Works Foot & Bicycle Paths Total
2010-2011 $6,210,000 $1,890,000 $4,200,000 $50,000 $12,350,000
2011-2012 $7,032,600 $2,003,400 $5,452,000 $53,000 $14,541,000
2012-2013 $7,454,556 $2,123,604 $5,779,120 $56,180 $15,413,460
2013-2014 $7,901,829 $2,251,021 $6,125,867 $59,551 $16,338,268
2014-2015 $8,375,939 $2,386,082 $6,493,419 $63,124 $17,318,564
2015-2016 $8,878,496 $2,529,247 $6,883,024 $66,911 $18,357,678
2016-2017 $9,411,206 $2,681,001 $7,296,006 $70,926 $19,459,139
2017-2018 $9,975,877 $2,841,862 $7,733,766 $75,182 $20,626,687
2018-2019 $10,574,430 $3,012,373 $8,197,792 $79,692 $21,864,287
2019-2020
2020-2021

A number of first cut renewal programs are under development and will be used to inform future budgets and LTFF.

4.5.2 Renewal Works

4.5.2.1 Surface Treatments

Road Surface Treatments - BRC uses or has used a number of different surface treatments, including:

  • Asphalt Overlays - Asphalt overlays are typically used in urban areas. 14mm overlays are used where heavy traffic is expected. 10mm overlays are used in less trafficked areas such as cul-de-sacs. (In response to stripping, oxidation or environmental cracking - not in the presence of condition 3 crocodile cracking.)
  • Slurry Seals are used in some urban areas as a low roughness, low noise alternative, but still relatively low cost alternative to sprayed seals.
  • Sprayed Seals are typically used in rural areas. 14mm, 10mm & 7mm seals are all used.
  • Primerseals are sometimes used to seal road shoulders
  • GATT Seals were used in the Childers area prior to the amalgamation as a cheap option for surfacing unsealed roads, but are no longer considered to be a preferred treatment.
  • Gravel Resheeting is used extensively to renew the unsealed road network. Resheets are typically 100mm to 150mm in depth.
  • Emulsion Seals are used to stabilise small areas on unsealed roads prone to scouring.

A number of the above treatments are unlikely to be used in the future, and there are a number of variations of the above treatments (e.g. various treatment depths) that can be used depending on the exact circumstance. The treatments below are the ones most likely to be used into the future.

  • Sprayed C170 Bituminous Reseal - Typically a 7mm, 10mm or 14mm Sprayed Seal on an existing sprayed seal. Generally used in Rural areas. Typically age used as driving factor and/or surface texture defects. When the segment has a high pavement defect or crocodile cracking defect presence. In situations where existing segment is Asphalt (in Urban areas commonly). Size of stone is determined on a project by project basis as the surface voids generally drives the size of the aggregate. Typically done in response to stripping, oxidation or environmental cracking, but not in the presence of condition 3 crocodile cracking
  • 30mm AC Overlay - Fine gap graded 7mm to 10mm nominal stone/mix. Typically use a C320 binder. Used generally in Urban areas only. Typically age (Ravelling) used as driving factor and/or local surface defects. This is a more expensive treatment and offers a smother surface for high and residental traffic and lowers noise in Urban areas and stops the sheer distresses from parked vehicles. When the segment has some but not high pavement defect or crocodile cracking defect presence. Also on Rural roads.
  • 50mm AC Overlay - Fine gap graded 14mm nominal stone/mix. Typically use a C320 binder. Used generally in Urban heavily trafficked areas only or where roundabouts are present or have a high percentage of turning volumes. Typically age (Ravelling) used as driving factor and/or local surface defects. Heavily trafficked areas i.e. Commercial and light vehicles or at intersections where severe distresses are present. Sprayed C170 Reseal with Heavy Patching Typically a 7mm, 10mm or 14mm Sprayed Seal on an existing sprayed seal, with prepatory patching. Generally used in Rural areas. Typically age used as driving factor and/or surface texture defects and also there are minor pavement or crocodile cracking defects present. When the segment has a high pavement defect or crocodile cracking defect presence. In situations where existing segment is Asphalt (in Urban areas commonly).
  • 30mm AC Overlay with Heavy Patching - Fine gap graded 7mm to 10mm nominal stone/mix. Typically use a C320 binder. Used generally in Urban areas only. Typically age (Ravelling) used as driving factor and/or local surface defects. This is a more expensive treatment and offers a smother surface for high and residential traffic and lowers noise in Urban areas and stops the sheer distresses from parked vehicles. Also there are minor pavement or crocodile cracking defects present. When the segment has high pavement defect or crocodile cracking defect presence. Also on Rural roads.
  • Slurry Seals - Typically apply a inexpensive surface treatment which comprises of bitumen and sand. To substitute for an asphalt or spray seal treatment, thereby improving the amenity and reduction of noise without the cost of an asphalt treatment. When the segment has some but not high pavement defect or crocodile cracking defect presence.
  • Slurry Seals with Major Patching - Typically apply a inexpensive surface treatment which comprises of bitumen and sand. To substitute for an asphalt or spray seal treatment, thereby improving the amenity and reduction of noise without the cost of an asphalt treatment. Pavement defects and crocodile defects are present. When the segment has some but not high pavement defect or crocodile cracking defect presence. Graded Aggregate Total Treatment (GATT) Apply this surface which is a mixture of a slurry / asphalt, has different size particles. To surface an unsealed road with a cheaper surface and little preparation. On existing sealed roads or on unsealed with poor pavement depth and shape.

4.5.2.2 Pavement Treatments

Pavement Treatments - BRC used the following pavement treatments.

  • Rip & Reseal - Rip the existing sprayed seal surface and tyne into pavement. Apply a new sprayed seal. Because of local surface defects will make the road rough if apply a straight reseal on top. Hence this is used mainly on high speed rural roads. Will not do this treatment on urban roads. Treatment undertaken to reduce roughness and allow for a smooth ride.
  • Granular Overlay - Rip, reshape and addition of granular pavement material (typically 150mm rule of thumb). Finished off with a Sprayed Seal wearing course. Generally a treatment applied to Rural roads. Pavement failures and/or insufficient cover to subgrade. Where a bituminous seal will not rectify the current defects. Also to fix shape corrections. Where there is insufficent batter widths or the treatment will result in a reduced lane width that is not acceptable to current traffic volumes. Also where there are level limitations in the form of kerb and gutter.
  • Insitu Stabilisation - A two pass operation that involves the addition of chemical add mixtures to the surface, which is then mixed with the underlying pavement (typically up to 200mm in depth). Pavement compacted with a final seal applied. Pavement failures and/or insufficient cover to subgrade. Where a bituminous seal will not rectify the current defects. May involve the addition of extra pavement material. Where services are located within limits of the pavement. Typically rule of thumb is sprayed seal in Rural areas and asphalt in Urban areas.
  • Reconstruction - Total reconstruction of the road segment. In cases where all other treatments are not viable. Also in cases where the road may require widening or realignment or adjustment of levels.

4.5.2.3 Footpath Treatments

Footpath Treatments - For concrete footpaths the only realistic renewal option is the replacement of the existing footpath with a new one.

4.5.2.4 Bridge Renewal Options

Bridge Renewal - There are a number of rehabilitation activities that can be carried out on timber bridges, including;

  • Deck replacement,
  • Splicing or installing supplementary piles,
  • Plating corroded steel sections,
  • Rail replacement.

More often however timber bridges will be replaced with concrete bridges or box culverts when they reach the end of their life.

4.5.3 Intervention Levels

Road Renewal Intervention Levels - BRC does not have a well documented methodology for assessing when a road segment should be renewed, but we are currently analysing at the PCI and SCI data collected by AARB in early 2010 to try to determine appropriate intervention levels.

The Assetic Pavement Condition Index field currently contains values between 0 and 6. The graph below shows how the pavement is assumed to be consumed over time and how this relates to PCI scores. A PCI score of 5 means that a pavement has an RUL of 7 years or less. Until the science of renewal program generation is developed further, perhaps the nominated renewal intervention level should simply be that segments with a PCI of 5 should be inspected within 12 months with a view to them being considered for inclusion in the Pavement Renewal Program.

Assetic-Road-Pavement-Consumption-Profile.png

BRC's footpath network, is in pretty good condition, and most defective panels are replaced under maintenance before the segment as a whole deteriorates enough to trigger a renewal, but the theoretical intervention levels are as follows;

  1. Footpaths located within the CBD and other highly trafficked areas in Condition 4 or worse to be referred to Capital Works Program and replaced within 3 years.
  2. Footpaths located in other areas in Condition 5 or worse to be referred to Capital Works Program and replaced within 3 years.
  3. Footpaths in Condition 6 to be removed ASAP, and replaced when funding permits

4.6 New & Upgraded Roads

New & Upgraded Roads - As is the case with the table showing renewal expenditure (Section 4.5) the exact break up of capital expenditure in future years is uncertain, so an estimate of new and upgrade expenditure has been made by applying typical new to renewal ratios to the known overall capital expenditure figures.

As noted in Section 4.5 Renewal Expenditure, Council will generate 1st Cut Renewal Programs from the Asset management system to inform the budget process for 2012/13. Council will base these estimates on the assets Remaining Useful Life’s (RULs) and replacement costs less residual value as recorded in the Council's Asset Register.

Council’s strategy is to develop a prioritised Capital Expenditure Program including (Renewals; Upgrades; and New) based on service levels, condition assessments, intervention levels, remaining useful life, and current service and maintenance levels.

The Asset Management system was not used to prepare the 2010 Long Term Financial Forecast and the expenditure was not split between Renewal, Upgrade and New.

Planned New & Upgrade Expenditure on Roads
Major Projects Minor Projects Foot & Bicycle Paths
2010-2011 $690,000 $210,000 $2,850,000
2011-2012 $781,400 $222,600 $477,000
2012-2013 $828,284 $235,956 $505,620
2013-2014 $877,981 $250,113 $535,957
2014-2015 $930,660 $265,120 $568,114
2015-2016 $986,500 $281,027 $602,202
2016-2017 $1,045,690 $297,889 $638,334
2017-2018 $1,108,431 $315,762 $676,634
2018-2019 $1,174,937 $334,708 $717,232
2019-2020
2020-2021

4.7 Road Disposals

Road Disposals - Road Disposals are quite rare, and Bundaberg Regional Council has no plans to dispose of any road assets in the next ten years.

4.8 Risk Management

Risk Management - Council recognises 4 levels of risk, low, medium, high and extreme. These risk associated with a given hazard is calculated in accordance with Council's Risk Management Policy using the following risk matrix.

Risk-Matrix.png

All identified risks are recorded in Council's Risk Management System. The system contains a hazard register and a rectification action plan.

Council typically adopts one or more of the following risk handling options when risks are identified.

  • accepting risk;
  • reducing likelihood of event;
  • reducing the consequences of event;
  • transferring the risk;
  • sharing the risk;

Risks

Hosting the plan online and backing it up locally should ensure that the plan content is safe even in the case of a server failure.
Internet outages can restrict access to the live version of the plan from time to time, but the data itself should be very safe.
Backups of the plan are made regularly and stored in the directory: S:\Support Services\Assets\Asset Management Plans.

5. Asset Management Practices

5.1 Asset Management Systems

Asset Management Systems - Bundaberg Regional Council uses a the following software systems & databases to manage various asset management related tasks.

Software System Interaction Diagram
Software-System-Map4.png

5.2 Standards & Guidelines

Standards & Guidelines - BRC has referred to a wide range of standards and guidelines in developing its asset management practices, including those listed below;

5.3 Work Instructions

Work Instructions - The way many activities are to be carried out is documented in detailed work instructions in Council's IMS System.

5.4 Reporting Requirements

Roads Reporting Requirements - BRC is required to prepare a number of reports related to the road network, including:

5.4.1 Grants Commission Return

Grants Commission Return - Queensland Councils are required to report on a number of variables to the Queensland Local Government Grants Commission each year.

  1. Length of roads grouped by class & traffic volumes.
  2. Number and area of bridges and culverts.
  3. Length of reseals carried out within the past financial year.

5.4.2 LRRS Network Return

LRRS Network Return - The LRRS Network Return is an annual report that is submitted to The Roads Alliance for verification and allocation of funding.

Information included in the return includes:

  • ????
  • ????

6. Improvement and Monitoring

6.1 Road Data Quality

Road Data Quality - The following Road data quality issues have been identified.

  • Some related fields in the roads table are showing inconsistent information.
  • The exact location of some of the footpaths in the footpath register are very poorly described, leaving open the possibility that some footpath segments have been duplicated or overlooked.
  • The RULs of each component in each road segment were computed from condition scores assigned to them post amalgamation. Because the current condition scoring system is a 5 point system the RULs assigned are very clumpy.
  • Footpath RULs & condition scores currently missing from footpath table.
  • The useful lives quoted in Section 4.1 of the AMP are really just educated guesses.
  • Reliable traffic count data is only available for a small percentage of roads.

6.2 Road data quality mitigation

Road Data Quality Mitigation - A number of actions are planned to improve the quality of road related data in Council's Asset Management System.

  • A list of roads with inconsistent data has been generated and discrepancies are being investigated.
  • It is planned to commence cleaning the footpath table in the 2010-2011 financial year.
  • It should be possible to gain more confidence in the useful life adopted for road pavements by ensuring that the next time data is collected (possibly in 3 to 5 years time) that the exactly the same information is collected. This will allow us to determine how SCI changes over time and should allow us to model a fairly accurate road pavement useful life.
  • Moving to a 10 or 100 point road condition assessment system will allow for more realistic WDRCs when condition scores are reset to the top of a range after a revaluation.
  • Publishing as much existing data about the road network both here and on the internal BRC Wiki, and encouraging the readers and users of the AMP/wiki to advise the Assets Section of any errors or inconsistencies.

6.3 Estimate of Reliability

Estimate of Reliability - The majority of the figures used in BRC's Asset Management Plans are generated from Council's Assetic Asset Management System. The Assetic database was compiled from numerous databases and spreadsheets used by the former Councils of Bundaberg, Burnett, Isis & Kolan. The quality of the data available varied from Council to Council and asset class to asset class, and in some cases has been further degraded as a result of the aggregation process.

Council is in the early stages of developing and implementing long term management systems and as such expects the Long Term Asset Management Plan, incorporating this Asset Management Plan and associated expenditure programs, to change significantly over the next five years as these systems mature and better information becomes available.

It should be noted that Council has made significant advances in the reliability of the base data (quantity, location, condition and value) since amalgamation.

7. References

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